The Newlywed Shower

A once long standing tradition that seems to be fading fast, is the shower of rice over the newlywed couple. Rice is a symbol of abundance and fertility. It also represents prosperity and good fortune. Traditionally, this shower was done after the reception, once the bride and groom had changed into their “going away” attire, and were leaving for their honeymoon. These days, the bride and groom want to stay at the reception to celebrate with their family and friends. Staying until the last guest leaves is not unheard of today. They really do not want to make the quick getaway — they would rather stay and party!

Most couples are now choosing to have bird seed, rose petals or confetti showers as they exit the church. Then, they escape to a waiting car, and are driven to the reception site. Other variations of the newlywed shower include blowing bubbles, or ringing tiny bells as they leave the church. These are all charming ways to keep the tradition of showering the couple alive and well, in the twenty-first century.

You will need to check with the church, or other wedding site venue, as to the rules pertaining to what they allow for the showering. Rice is now considered environmentally hazardous because of the ill effects it has on our feathered friends, the birds, and is not allowed at most churches.

Some traditions are sentimental, some are beautiful and some are practical, but remember, there are always alternatives. If doing something different makes you feel uncomfortable, then go with the long standing tradition. Being “different” for the sake of being different is not always appropriate, especially when planning your wedding. The long lasting traditions were created for very special reasons, and should be included in your very special day.

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