Invitation Wording Dilemma: Non-Standard Situations

Last week we gave you the basic skinny on the standard protocol for listing (or not listing) parents on the wedding invitation. But as with so many things involving weddings and major life events, “standard” rarely applies in the real world! To help couples navigate the potentially intimidating realm of wording a formal invitation, we’re starting a blog series to address some of the more common – and not so common – questions we get about handling non-standard situations.

So let’s start with a basic: Missy’s Mom and Dad are contributing to the wedding expenses, but Missy and Mason are pitching in where they can, and Mason’s parents are also footing portions of the bill. In any situation where the event’s “hosts” aren’t necessarily obvious, you can word your invitation to more appropriately reflect the contributions of those involved. Using the above example, Missy and Mason might opt for wording such as:

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Michael Smith

Mr. and Mrs. Noah Edwards Adams

Request the pleasure of your company at the marriage of their children

Missy Belle Smith


Mason Geoffrey Adams

Another option for a similar situation is to leave the parents’ names off all together:

Together with their parents (or families)

Missy Belle


Mason Geoffrey

Request the honor of your presence …

We find the choice between these two options is typically easy: Some parents really want to be on that invitation! Others don’t consider it crucial. Either option works beautifully to keep the focus on the real center of the event – the happy couple.

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